Skip to main content

About your Search

20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
you, pat. the u.s. embassy under attack in syria. how is the united states responding? in pakistan they are burning our flags. and we are giving them millions. [ male announcer ] there's more barbeque time in every bag of kingsford charcoal. kingsford. slow down and grill. . >> our flag on fire, the u.s. embassy under attack as was the american ambassador's residence, people described as "thugs," reaching the wall of the embassy compound and breaking cameras and bonds and the united states is seeking compensation for the damage. meanwhile the united states announcing cutting back aid to pakistan. $800 million in military aid is being withheld after they decided to cancel vistas for 100 military trainers and my guest says the cuts are a good start. lieutenant colonel peters joins me. welcome. this is 40 percent of our annual aid to pakistan. should we retract the rest of it, as well? >>guest: i wish we could cut all aid to pakistan. pakistan is a rogue state. the pakistani military and security services are addicted to terror and we keep giving them money for another fix. but we can
from the middle east and afghanistan and pakistan. americans were the new gold standard and we have a generation al-qaida 2.0 and they are the new version of the digital jihadist. >> historically said terrorist are a muslim male and if you don't fit that profile you don't have to worry. in the book you say that is no longer the model. >> that's right. the american sudden al awaki. whether he is e-mailing or bloging or skyping he using technology and the facebook friend from hell. he spreads ideology to. there is a documented case was home grown terrorism since january 2009 every few weeks. >> what is a sign that a parent ought to be worried about their child recruited or sought after by the terrorist? >> common links we see is the american cleric. lookk at the cases in the united states. almost always the fingerprints of this digital jihadist . the young man who drove the car bomb not far from where we are. he was a diseeple . travel to pakistan and got his training. this event in times square was a successful attack. he drove a car in there with what he thought was a viable explosi
pakistan a strong message >> the pakistani relationship is difficult but it must be made to work overtime. but until we get through these difficulties, we will hold back some of the many that the american taxpayers have committed to give. >> some $800 million? >> yep. >> it's a lot of cash but is it a political move. our next guest called out the pakistani government in 2006 claiming they knew osama bin laden in's location. peter thompson joins me. he's the author of the new book "the wars of afghanistan." good to see you. >> thank you. >> i want to get your thoughts we reported that the half-brother of huh mean karzai in afghanistan has been assassinated. how does that affect the relationships? >> he was assassinated by the taliban. this reflects assistmatic policy of the taliban and their isi handlers, the intelligence organization is i think behind this as well. and also al-qaeda. this policy is a tool to eliminate real and potential enemies of the islamists they want to reimplant back in cob he will. >> so this is a blow to the u.s. in afghanistan? >> yes, and also the destabilization
beau we were focused on the middle east and pakistan. and became the new gold standard and we have now a generation, i call it al-qaeda 2.0. in many respects they're the new version of the digital jihadists. so when you're talking about the fact that we've historically said, well, a terrorist is probably going to be a muslim, may open the muslim east, if you don't fit the profile chances are you don't have to worry. because in the book you say that's no longer the model. >> that's right. the heart of this is actually an american citizen anwar al-awlaki, he's a digital jihad its, whether he's e-mailing or blogging or skyping, he's kind of like the facebook friend from hell. he's using the negotiate networking against us and spreading the ideology of hate. what's frightening there's a documented case of home grown terrorism every two to three weeks since january of 2009. something we didn't see a decade ago. >>. >> mike: what are the signs a parent ought to be worry about, if their child is being recruited or sought after. >> one of the things we are see is the american cleric. if you lo
the truth is that al-qaida's hierarchy in afghanistan and pakistan that he's referring to has been severely weakened. we've seen several al-qaida leaders killed over the past ewu months and years. to say al-qaida's hierarchy has been weakened and could possibly be defeated is true. but al-qaida has shifted to yemen, to somalia and also the al-qaida movement. it's become such a global galvanizing movement, brian. you have self-starters here in america, in england who are acting on their own with no direct link to al-qaida so you can defeat al-qaida, yes, but the movement that al-qaida has sparked, the ideology is the real problem here and brian, real quick, this administration when they talk about the war on terror, the war against radical islam, they have tunnel vision! al-qaida is only one element of a much broader enemy, iran, hezbollah and the muslim brotherhood which this administration wants to reach out to. >> which is a little crazy. tell us about this bomb throw, we'll talk about this a little bit later as well. tell about the next move is sewing these explosive devices into people'
the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather. heather: they did their jobs. catherine, what does this attack mean for the u.s.? >> well, look, immediately in washington, the focus went back to three years ago and these attacks in mumbai, that was a series of attacks orchestrated by ten pakistani militants armed with cell phones, hand guns and backpacks with explosives. analysts here say if this latest attack causes friction between india and pakistan that could be serious trouble for the u.s. let's listen: >> if the attack were a cause to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major implications for the united states. we do not want to see those two countries go into another crisis and perhaps fight another war, which they've done three
. pakistan is a good example of a country where information sharing among known and suspected terrorists is still lacking. >> it is stunning that pakistan, which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism, does not even share fingerprint data within its own government. it doesn't share it with other pakistanis -- pakistani law enforcement agencies. that's a real problem. >> reporter: so the bottom line is that we can pour billions of dollars into our airport security but the overall system, of course, is only as good as the weakest link, gregg. gregg: the senator said this issue is more now. what has changed in that regard? >> >> reporter: let's take the example of the underwear bomber, it's a good example of a foreign national, in this case a nigerian, who came through yemen and on to amsterdam before he boarded a flight on christmas day in 2009, the american cleric, anwar al-awlaki, the first american on the kill or capture list was the first man there, abdulmutallab, and the bomb maker. >> the threat is far more diverge than it was -- diverse than it was a decade ago. now
certainly hurt the al-qaeda terrorist organization, in pakistan and afghanistan. but anwar al-awlaki is alive and well in yemen and he is planning additional attacks against americans. is the franchise there now the lead in al-qaeda and how dangerous and what can we do? >> al-qaeda is somewhat diffuse in the islamist most of the time. yemen a fertile ground. it does seem to be emerging as headquarters of sorts. yemen as a state doesn't exist right now. it was an iffy topic when it had a president but it essentially doesn't right now. so al-qaeda finding an open door. president obama came out and said the tide of war is receding but nobody gave that message to the islamist terrorists. we this had the christmas day bombing, not the one on the flight but the on other one on fed ex shipments. >> gregg: speaking of terrorists let's talk about libya and moammar khadafy who says he is willing to talk to america but he refuses to give up his position. so what is the point of talking to the guy? >> this has been going for five months. people have said that khadafy is losing or close to
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)